Wednesday, July 15, 2015

TAG Offsite: Carole Garland at La Galeria Gitana

Carole Garland, Grassland, Oil on Canvas, 14x18" 
Carole Garland has four small works in a group show entitled “Reflections of Life”  120 N. Maclay Ave
Suite E
San Fernando, CA 91340

The opening reception is Saturday July 18, 6-10 p.m. 

The exhibit runs through September 18.

Monday, July 13, 2015

Coming Exhibition: Don Adler, Suki Kuss, Joe Pinkleman

Tues. July 14th - Sat. August 8th, 2015

Opening Reception: Saturday, July 18, 5-8 p.m.

Artist Talk: Saturday, August 1st, 3 p.m.

Don Adler, Eroti-X
Don Adler, Torch, Marble, 20 x 7 x 7 in.
Don Adler's current exhibition, Eroti-X, is a combination of two concepts: erotic and X-rated art. The sensuous nature of carved stone is exhibited throughout this body of work, produced by the employment of design and technique. The softness of the surface, curvilinear shape, and form portray the exotic nature of the feminine soul (mystique). The repeated use of negative space draws the visual/cerebral sense into the mysterious nature of eroticism. Initially it is the eye that makes the connection, but in the end, the inner-self experiences the concept.

It is easy to understand the artist’s direction to the female subject when considering his 42-year occupation as a reproductive Gynecologist. Adler encourages the observer to not only visualize, but to touch and caress his art so as to absorb the erotic experience and warmth of his concepts.

Suki Kuss, State of Grace
Suki Kuss, To the Flame II, Mixed Media, 40 x 12 in.


Suki Kuss' latest show, State of Grace, reflects her feelings surrounding the past year -- a year in which her time was divided by the intensity of family life and the steady pull of her artistic instincts. Working was difficult and time spent in her studio was limited. The body of work resulting from her efforts represents that solitary limitation, each piece a complete yet delicate visual note.

Still using an austere, nearly monochromatic palette, Kuss' self assured quietude reinforces the title of her show. Her abstractions are filled with mysterious icons and highly feminine materials, lace, maps and line work.

Joe Pinkelman, Plates 
Joe Pinkelman, Plates #2, Porcelain, 42 x 42 in.
Plates, the new series of work by Joe Pinkelman, are decoratively and abstractly patterned plates. Some of the plates are cut away which breaks up the outer circumference of the form. Yet they are interlocked with plates that aren’t cut which forces the viewer to see the image as a whole, unified visual experience. Patterns are created by the surface and by the actual configuration of the plates themselves. What initially seems disjointed is actually a rhythmic unification of surface and form.

These pieces toy with the notion of Functional Art. As plates, they are completely functional, but once hung on the wall, and particularly grouped as Pinkelman has, they confront the viewer’s preconceived notions of what plates are for. Forcing the viewer to look again and more inquisitively is a trademark of Joe Pinkelman’s work.

Monday, July 6, 2015

Art Story: Camey McGilvray

Camey McGilvray, Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon, Painted Wood Sculpture, 37 x 37 x 3 in
Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon

Picasso has always been my favorite artist. Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon is an homage to him, but it is Picasso my way.

Picasso is noted for projecting both his mood and personality on to his canvasses. When he painted Les Demoiselles, he had just broken up with his mistress and expressed his sadness, anger and his hostility toward women in the painting: The subjects are brothel workers. Some of the figures are unflattering, unfeminine. (In fact, two were originally men, which he only partially converted to women.) Some of the faces are grotesque.

In my rendition, I eliminated the facial features entirely and softened or feminized some of the bodies. What remains is the beauty that attracted me to the piece in the first place: The wonderful symmetry of the placement of the figures and their perfect relationship one to another. The beautiful color and flow of the drapery and the audacious attitude of the women.

I worked on this piece for a good two months. In an attempt to do honor and be true to an artist and piece I held in such high reverence, some parts were done over and over. In producing my own rendition of this work, and becoming intimately involved in its every detail, I came to renew my appreciation and admiration of Picasso’s skill, genius really, in draftsmanship and composition. I also got to spend a good amount of quality time with my favorite artist.
Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, oil on canvas,  96 × 92 in, 1907 [source]
Camey will be discussing her art and process at a TAG Artists' Talk on Saturday, July 11, 3pm.
Do you have any questions for Camey? Leave them below in the comments.